Quote
"Telling a young girl she can’t wear what she wants because it’s not appropriate encourages the idea that men’s reactions should dictate society’s norms, and that all women are meta-Eves, tempting and ensnaring men with our sultry-eyed gaze. My parents’ culture is steeped in patriarchy, in the philosophy of the one-step machismo machine, where there is just one kind of man, and two kinds of women: the angel and the whore. These limited ideas of masculinity breed men who want ownership of women."

— Fariha Roison (via zubat)

(Source: voirsully, via becauseiamawoman)

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youngblackandvegan:

jay-escobar:

Fellas did u know ?

lol they don’t know about the signal

youngblackandvegan:

jay-escobar:

Fellas did u know ?

lol they don’t know about the signal

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taskscape:

i-will-lift-you-higher:

ambientheif:

jackthemother:

So this happened on facebook today….

BOOM

Thank god someone said it. You cannot fuck a vagina loose yo. Anatomy doesn’t work like that.

people that do not understand vaginas should not be allowed near one

(via southernsuperstitions)

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"Have you ever heard the phrase cockblocking? You know, you’re at a bar, talking to a girl, and what happens? Her less attractive friend comes over and ruins everything. Cockblock. Well I have to tell you something guys: I have been the less attractive friend, and you were NOT cockblocked. I was following orders from my better-looking friend that she did not wanna fuck you. …Girls have two signals for their friends: ‘I’m gonna fuck him’ and ‘HELP.’"

Amy Schumer [x] (via rashaka)

The number of “get me out of here” tactics women have developed and shared to help each other escape from overly-insistent-to-borderline-predatory dudes in public places should probably be enough evidence of the existence of rape culture all on its own.

(via madgastronomer)

YES

(via ellakrystina)

I especially like how, in the majority of cases, you don’t have to verbally communicate what your signals are to other women. I’ve had women I didn’t even know come save me. Literally every woman recognizes the “Dear god, help me” facial expression, and knows exactly what they should do. We don’t get a handbook for this. We don’t have a sit-down nail polish party where we talk about a standardized woman code for preventing creepers. It’s just part of being a woman.

BUT LOL RAPE CULTURE DOESN’T EXIST.

(via eastberlin)

Yup. I’ve definitely taken strangers by the arm and pulled her aside to go, “Oh my GOD it’s you! How ARE YOU?!? It’s been so long!” and then been like “hey I could overhear that guy who wouldn’t leave you alone so I figured I’d give you an out” and then see their VISIBLY RELIEVED expressions. This is part of girl code, because rape culture is that pervasive.

(via thebicker)

I once had a girl sit on my lap and say “hey baby” after she witnessed a guy (who was easily 20+ years older than me) hitting on me and harassing me for my number even after I told him I was taken. After he got up and left she asked if I was okay. I couldn’t thank her enough times, I even bought her a drink.

(via castielsmiles)

When I was 16 years old, I went to a club with my mother to see a band perform. The part of the club where the concert was taking place was too hot and crowded, and I broke away from it before I had a full anxiety attack, though I was still visibly shaken. As I sat down at the bar, with my clearly marked under-18 hand stamp, an older man sat down next to me and started talking about how much nicer concerts were in his home country. He kept trying to offer me drinks, even though I already had a cup of ice. He would not leave me alone, even after I pointed out my hand stamp. Said that he preferred younger girls. I started to panic again.

A woman that was about 6’1” came over, grabbed me, and about screamed, “Girlfriend! I lost you in the crowd! Come on, your dad’s outside to get us!” She dragged me outside of the club, gave me a hug, and left. I ended up ditching my mum and actually calling my dad to pick me up.

Never ignore the ‘please help me’ face, ladies.

(via touchofgrey37)

Had this happen so often to me as I grew up, being early with everything concerning puberty and body development. People notice. Ensured a large amount of cynicism and very practical way of dealing with this senseless stuff. Still, some people won’t understand a clear “No, fuck off” and the Please Help-face saved me when other women picked up on it. I myself helped out girls that way who didn’t dare to go against men, either telling off the men or pretending to be an old friend while I drag them out of the scene. Recently a man who has been beyond inappropriately creepy around me (the truly senseless way - which is what scares me as I don’t know if he has mental issues and knows how dangerous and ridiculously pushy without listening literally he’s being), where I lied through my teeth about the friend sitting next to me. She got it instantly. I can’t express how relieved I was.

It aggravates me so much. I don’t want to be overly cautious and turning down people when they ask if I want to “give it a shot” before knowing me properly - despite meaning it well. This isn’t the way to go. I need to know you first. An idea of who you are, your good and bad sides. Don’t jump on me senselessly. Sigh.

Help each other, ladies.
That was the whole point of starting this blog, to me.

(via aureliasthoughts)

And the fucked up thing about all of this is that even qith all of these women speaking up and sharing stories like this, there will still be doubt, we will be told by men that we are “overreacting” to our harassment.

(via sourcedumal)

(via princeofbellehair)

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"Twilight has problems with misogyny and with abusive relationships. I don’t want to sugar-coat that. But if you, dear reader, are going around saying that Twilight is proof that girls are all stupid-heads who want a brooding vampire to stalk and abuse them, then you are being misogynistic.

In all my years of life, I have never heard anyone seriously speculate that the popularity of femme fatales in fiction means that all men secretly yearn for an abusive relationship; yet in the time since Twilight was released, I have heard the meme that all girls wish to be abused more times than I can count. This is a failure of understanding the difference between fantasy and reality, and it is a “failure” that conveniently props up existing misogynistic narratives about how women who stay with abusers stay because they secretly want to be abused rather than because they are groomed (by both their abuser and the larger society) to stay with their abuser, and because society does not empower them to leave. This is a comforting lie we tell ourselves because it’s easier to blame abuse victims than acknowledge that we are failing them."

Ana Mardoll’s Ramblings: Twilight: Abuse and Attention (via michaelblume)

This, and ditto for “Fifty Shades of Grey.”

(via and-also-lace)

(via faultyfeminist)

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"Men celebrated our sexual liberation — our willingness to freely give and enjoy blow jobs and group sex, our willingness to experiment with anal penetration — but ultimately many males revolted when we stated that our bodies were territories that they could not occupy at will. Men who were ready for female sexual liberation if it meant free pussy, no strings attached, were rarely ready for feminist female sexual agency. This agency gave us the right to say yes to sex, but it also empowered us to say no."

bell hooks, Communion: The Female Search for Love (via a-golden-lasso-of-my-own)

Wow, that is so important. This quote is crucial to discussing sexual liberation and in general female sexuality in the context of patriarchy. 

(via dirtydarwin)

(via dirtydarwin)

Quote
"Quite honestly, my objection to rape jokes is not even because I particularly find the jokes personally triggering anymore; I generally just find them pathetic and inexplicable. And while I’m bothered by the fact that the jokes normalize and effectively minimize the severity of rape and thus perpetuate the rape culture, I’m more bothered by the thought of a woman who’s recently been raped, who’s just experienced what may be the worst thing that will ever happen to her, and goes to the site of her favorite webcomic, or turns on the telly, or goes to the cinema, or a comedy club, to have a much-needed laugh—only to see that horrible, life-changing thing used as the butt of a joke. I don’t understand—and I don’t believe I ever will—why anyone wants to be the person who sends that shiver down her spine, who makes her eyes burn hot with tears at an unwanted memory while everyone else laughs and laughs."

http://shakespearessister.blogspot.com/2010/08/survivors-are-so-sensitive.html

This is the most spot on description of how I feel about rape jokes I’ve seen.

(via incurablycurious)

TW RAPE

(via feminist-space)

(Source: tenderbearhugs, via bluueoreo)

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silversarcasm:

[Gifset: Laverne Cox speaks at the GLAAD media awards, she says,

"Each and every one of us has the capacity to be an oppressor. I want to encourage each and every one of us to interrogate how we might be an oppressor, and how we might be able to become liberators for ourselves and each other."]

femmeanddangerous:

(x)

(Source: fuckyeahlavernecox, via fearlessfeminism)

Tags: oppression
Quote
"

“Sex negative” and “sex positive” are relatively useless terms in terms of discussing feminist approaches to issues of sex and sexuality. The terms convey the message that “sex positivity” equals support for a vision of sex and sexuality that is defined by patriarchy and one that is primarily libertarian. What’s defined as “sex positive feminism” tends to translate to: non-critical of the sex industry, BDSM, burlesque, and generally, anything that can be related to “sex.” “Non-judgement” is the mantra espoused by so-called “sex-positive feminists,” which is troubling because it ends up framing critical thought and discourse as “judgement” and therefore negative. Since I tend to see critical thinking as a good thing, the “don’t judge me”/”don’t say anything critical about sex because it’s sex and therefore anything goes” thing doesn’t sit well with me.

“Sex negative,” on the other hand, tends to be ascribed to feminists who are critical of prostitution, pornography, strip clubs, burlesque, BDSM and, really, sex and sexuality as defined by patriarchy and men. The reason that feminists are critical of these things is because they want to work towards a real, liberated, feminist understanding of sex and sexuality, rather than one that sexualizes inequality, domination and subordination, is male-centered, and is harmful and exploitative of women. To me, that sounds far more “sex positive” (from a feminist perspective, anyway), than blind support for anything sex-related, because sex.

"

The divide isn’t between ‘sex negative’ and ‘sex positive’ feminists — it’s between liberal and radical feminism (via feministcurrent)

(via feministcurrent)

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queermutant:

The best comment I’ve seen all day

queermutant:

The best comment I’ve seen all day

(via feminist-space)

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youngmarxist:

So if we have to show women what the baby looks like in their womb and tell them how the process works before allowing them to get an abortion, does that mean we should teach our soldiers about the culture of the lands we’re invading, and explain to them that the people we want them to kill have families and feel pain, just like Americans?

(via vegantine)

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"When you’re in a room and everyone else on the creative team are men and you’re making a point about a character that’s a woman, quite often you’ll be voted down. So a lot of the view of womanhood we’re seeing is predominantly a male perspective. There are so few women directing, producing movies."

— Keira Knightley about the lack of women in the industry (via cassandraoftroy)

(Source: keiraquotes, via faultyfeminist)

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liquorinthefront:

CUTE OVERLOAD

(Source: trill-hippy, via gardenfemme)

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sexetc:

Today is National Youth HIV + AIDS Awareness Day. Let’s work toward an AIDS-free generation. Start by knowing your status. Reblog and raise awareness!

(via fearlessfeminism)